Thursday, July 14, 2005

Krakks in the Facade


Um.

Is the identicality of the KRAKKs an homage or is there some sort of template they use for this stuff? Pardon me if I'm being naive...

Can some of you art-types explain it to me?

13 comments:

Ray Palmer said...

It's simple physics. For every KRAKK there is an equal and opposite KRAKK.

Jacob "H" Tucker said...

You know if you did this story around X-Mas time you could have called it "Christmas with the Krakks" a hilarious play on the title of the hit comedy starring TV's Tim Allen and Jamie Lee Curtis.

Mark Fossen said...

Well ... how else would you draw a KRAKK? it draws itself, really.

Jason said...

Since so much is done with computers these days, I'd just assume that the KRAKK is a cut & paste job from some typographic template.

N said...

Who gives a KRAKK?

What I wanna know is, how did Hal Jordan (?) manage to punch Batman? Did the ring give him extra reflexes?

Chris Arndt said...

The magic probably took the reflexes away.

jstuder55104 said...

Batman had his guard down trying to bring Hal in and Hal just let fly so he could continue to fight Parralax if I remember correctly

Amy said...

You'll note the "fwoosh" in the JLA issue is exactly the same as examples from GLs, too.

My vote says it's a standard font, especially given the emphasis on computer coloring.

It's not quite as lazy as Xeroxing an entire panel (which I've seen far too often), though.

Harvey Jerkwater said...

Obviously nobody here has ever been in a fistfight.

Should you ever deck somebody with a solid right cross, the outlines of a large word will appear in the air, usually "KRAKK." The artists are simply documenting the true nature of violence and fisticuffery.

A good uppercut usually generates an opaque "WHOOM," while a sharp jab produces a small jagged "WHAP."

You've gotta be careful, though. If you follow through too much on the cross, you can cut yourself on the edge of the last "K." That thing's dang sharp.

Scipio said...

This is why my people were pacifists; the SFX of fighting is too hard to spell.

jnr said...

if both of these books were lettered by the same artist, or studio? my guess would be that after taking the time to assemble this awesome krakk (otice how the r and k overlap the giant a...this suggests that the word was initally composed in at least three layers, so someone took some time to make this), it was saved for posterity. and since comic lettering is done in applications that work with layers--like adobe illustrator--transferring the template-krakk is a simple matter of copy and paste, or dragging the layer to a new document. from there, the basic krakk can be scaled or otherwise adjusted pretty easily.

but it's also possible that this is one of richard starking's fonts (www.comicraft.com, i think). and rich has included the whole sfx as a special character on the font.

starking's sites (www.comicraft.com and www.comicbookfonts.com) are great resources for folks who're interested in lettering comics, by the way. fun place to kill a little time.

TotalToyz said...

Just say "no" to KRAKK!

Damion Molacek said...

Keep Blogging!